Morton’s Neuroma Causes

A neuroma is an inflammation of the nerve on the ball of foot just behind the toe.  The inflammation can become scar tissue and cause persistent pain.

Severe pain and discomfort that is felt on the ball of the foot may be indicative of a condition that is referred to as Morton’s neuroma. It is often the result of nerves that become inflamed between the third and fourth toes, and is often known as a intermetatarsal neuroma. A major symptom of this condition is pain that is experienced on the bottom of the foot, possibly causing difficulty in walking. Many people may generally feel a tingling sensation in addition to feeling a burning sensitivity in the ball of the foot. A common reason for this condition to occur may be choosing to wear shoes that do not fit properly, and this may possibly cause the nerves in the foot to become irritated and inflamed. Additionally, performing certain activities may play a significant role in the formation of Morton’s neuroma. It’s advised to counsel with a podiatrist for proper treatments if you are afflicted with this ailment

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. John Hoy of Seattle Foot and Ankle Center. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton’s neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities
Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Seattle, WA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Morton’s Neuroma

A neuroma is a thickening of nerve tissue and can develop throughout the body. In the foot, the most common neuroma is a Morton’s neuroma; this typically forms between the third and fourth toes. The thickening of the nerve is typically caused by compression and irritation of the nerve; this thickening can in turn cause enlargement and, in some cases, nerve damage.

Neuromas can be caused by anything that causes compression or irritation of the nerve. A common cause is wearing shoes with tapered toe boxes or high heels that force the toes into the toe boxes. Physical activities that involve repeated pressure to the foot, such as running or basketball, can also create neuromas. Those with foot deformities, such as bunions, hammertoes, or flatfeet, are more likely to develop the condition.

Symptoms of Morton’s neuroma include tingling, burning, numbness, pain, and the feeling that either something is inside the ball of the foot or that something in one’s shoe or sock is bunched up. Symptoms typically begin gradually and can even go away temporarily by removing one’s shoes or massaging the foot. An increase in the intensity of symptoms correlates with the increasing growth of the neuroma.

Treatment for Morton’s neuroma can vary between patients and the severity of the condition. For mild to moderate cases, padding, icing, orthotics, activity modifications, shoe modifications, medications, and injection therapy may be suggested or prescribed. Patients who have not responded successfully to less invasive treatments may require surgery to properly treat their condition. The severity of your condition will determine the procedure performed and the length of recovery afterwards.